German Courses

From elementary and intermediate German to studying German, Austrian, and Swiss culture and literature to learning about the environment, the Holocaust, or race in German film, our German Studies program offers a wide range of classes to give you an in-depth understanding of the culture, history and people of Europe's German-speaking countries.

NC State Schedule of Courses


Fall 2019

Prerequisite for all courses (except for FLG 440): FLG 202, 212, or equivalent (placement, AP Scores, etc.)

All courses are taught in German.

FLG 301 Advanced German

MWF 11:45 – 12:35, Dr. Lutz Kube, lkube@ncsu.edu

MW 3:00 – 4:15, Dr. James Brown, jhbrown3@ncsu.edu

This class is a continuation of FLG 202 and uses the second half of the same textbook, Denk mal! and its extensive interactive supersite learning materials. We will do advanced grammar work and writing practice within the context of informative texts, focusing on German traditions, science and technology, environmental issues, business culture, and national identity.

FLG 307 Business German

TH 3:00 – 4:15, Dr. Lynda Nyota, lknyota@ncsu.edu

This course will provide you with an introduction to the language used in business settings in German-speaking countries. We will cover topics such as: communication through phone, emails, letters, writing a resume and job application, preparing for a job interview, ordering products and marketing, banking, company organization forms, and doing a presentation on a product and on your company. We will also discuss current issues concerning the German and European economy.

FLG 320 Introduction to German Literature

TH 10:15 – 11:30, Dr. Ruth Gross, rvgross@ncsu.edu

You will learn to read and analyze German, Austrian, and Swiss literary texts in their cultural and historical contexts. We’ll discuss various genres (short story, novel, drama, poetry), formal aspects, literary periods, and a variety of critical approaches, using examples from the Middle Ages to the mid-twentieth century.

FLG 440 Green Germany

TH 1:30 – 2:45, Dr. Helga G. Braunbeck, helga_braunbeck@ncsu.edu

Prerequisite: One FLG 300-level course.

The German-speaking culture has a long "green" tradition reflected in the arts, in literature, and in scientific discoveries. We will discuss everything from nature poetry and landscape painting to the Germans' strong environmental consciousness, the Green Party, sustainability practices, green architecture, climate change, the latest environmental technologies, and the growing threats to the earth’s biosphere and atmosphere.


Spring 2019

Prerequisite for all courses (except for FLG 492): FLG 202, 212, or equivalent (placement, AP Scores, etc.).

All courses are taught in German.

FLG 302 German Oral and Written Expression

TH 1:30 – 2:45, Dr. Helga G. Braunbeck, helga_braunbeck@ncsu.edu

Have you ever wanted to develop successful reading strategies for texts written in a foreign language? How about training your ear for understanding the main points of a German lecture and taking good notes? Or creating and delivering an effective presentation that wows your audience? And finally, learning techniques for organizing arguments, facts and examples into a well-written paper? We will work with authentic German materials to develop these skills and improve all aspects of your proficiency in the German language. Topics include language and society, how language shapes your thinking, and issues currently being discussed in Germany, Austria and Switzerland.

FLG 302 and FLG 301 may be taken in random order – both courses strengthen language skills at the 300 level.

FLG 325 German Lyric Poetry

TH 10:15-11:30, Dr. Ruth Gross, rvgross@ncsu.edu

In this course we will read and learn to appreciate the 18th, 19th and early 20th century German lyric poem (short, personal verse) that is so much a part of the German cultural tradition. Not only will we look at poetry as poetry, by authors like Claudius, Goethe, Schiller, Mueller, Heine, etc, but also the poetry as it is musically set in its related art form, the German Lied. This course is meant for all those students who have a “fear of poetry” as well as for those who love it.

FLG 318 New German Cinema and Beyond

TH 3:00 – 4:15, Dr. Lynda Nyota, lknyota@ncsu.edu

In this course students will explore 20th and 21st century German cinema in two parts, beginning with New German Cinema, the new wave in German film production (from the 1960s to the 1980s) that closely parallels the rise and fall of the Berlin Wall. We shall examine how a new generation of German filmmakers gained an international reputation for their artistry and critical commentary on German society. The second part of the course will introduce students to a selection of “post-wall” German films (1990 to the present) that are representative of the contemporary German film scene. The course will incorporate German grammar through film and will also introduce students to basic film terminology in German, enabling students to analyze and discuss film in German.

FLG 492 Senior Seminar: Germans and Americans

MW 3:00 – 4:15, Dr. James Brown, jhbrown3@ncsu.edu

Prerequisite: Two 300 level FLG courses on literature or culture or film.

In this course we will examine aspects of the important relationship between these two countries: how German-speakers have experienced America, imagined America, and shaped America. By working with a variety of media, including reports, poems, diaries, novels, and film, we will have a chance to reflect on what it means to be American, to be German, and to see our own society through the eyes and words of another.


Fall 2018


Prerequisite for all courses (except for FLG 420): FLG 202, 212, or equivalent (placement, AP Scores, etc.)

All courses are taught in German.


FLG 301 Advanced German

MWF 11:45-12:35, Dr. Lutz Kube, lkube@ncsu.edu
TH 11:45-1:00, Dr. Lynda Nyota, lkny@ncsu.edu

This class is a continuation of FLG 202 and uses the second half of the same textbook, Denk mal! and its extensive interactive supersite learning materials. We will do advanced grammar work and writing practice within the context of informative texts, focusing on German traditions, science and technology, environmental issues, business culture, and national identity.

FLG 315 German Civilization and Culture

MWF 3:00-3:50, Dr. James Brown, jhbrown3@ncsu.edu

We will discuss major aspects of German civilization, covering about 300 years from 1700 until 2000. The concept of civilization includes history, politics, literature, art, music, and architecture. One focus of the class will be the city of Berlin as the cultural and political center of Germany and as a paradigm of German history. We will also discuss on how during that 300 years a concept of the German nation was formed and changed during the course of time.


FLG 320 Introduction to German Literature

TH 10:15-11:30, Dr. Ruth Gross, rvgross@ncsu.edu

You will learn to read and analyze German, Austrian, and Swiss literary texts in their cultural and historical contexts. We’ll discuss various genres (short story, novel, drama, poetry), formal aspects, literary periods, and a variety of critical approaches, using examples from the Middle Ages to the mid-twentieth century.


FLG 420 Current Issues in German-Language Media
TH 3:00-4:15
, Dr. Lynda Nyota, lknyota@ncsu.edu

Prerequisite: Two courses at the FLG 300 level
We will explore the complexity of contemporary German culture through the media. Topics covered range from information privacy, copyright issues, and Germany in relation to the EU, to environmental, educational and economic policy. New media such as news blogs, twitter feeds and podcasts, as well as older media like newspapers, radio, and television will serve not only as a means to learn about contemporary German culture, but also as the subject of conversation themselves.


Spring 2018


Prerequisite for all courses (except for FLG 492): FLG 202, 212, or equivalent (placement, AP Scores, etc.).

All courses are taught in German.

FLG 302 German Oral and Written Expression

MWF 11:45 12:35

Dr. Lutz Kube, lkube@ncsu.edu

In this course we will use authentic texts and materials from contemporary Germany to develop your facility with the German language. We will use images,

texts, film, and online media to discuss a variety of topics in German culture, especially youth and youth culture. We will look both to the current situation as well as to the past to see how Germany’s young compare and contrast with that of the United States. FLG 302 may be taken before FLG 301 – both courses strengthen language skills at the 300 level.

FLG 311 Translation

MWF 10:15 – 11:05

Dr. Michelle Eley, mreley@ncsu.edu

This course provides a practical and theoretical introduction to translation from and into German. What is the role of the translator? By what criteria can a translator make his or her decisions? Translation practices will be discussed not only from a linguistic, but also from a cultural and historical perspective.

FLG 323 Twentieth Century German Literature – Focus on Franz Kafka

TH 10:15 11:30

Dr. Ruth Gross, rvgross@ncsu.edu

If you think of dream of musical dogs, scholarly apes, or starving as an art, writing as torture, and waking up one morning and being turned into a giant vermin (and even if you don’t) – this class is for you. The focus of this course will be Franz Kafka, one of the major German-language writers of the 20th century.

FLG 492 Senior Seminar: Environmental Literature, Art and Film
TH 1:30 – 2:45

Dr. Helga G. Braunbeck, helga_braunbeck@ncsu.edu

Prerequisite: Two 300 level FLG courses on literature or culture or film, or talk to Dr. Braunbeck

Germany's deep involvement with nature and environmental issues is reflected in its literature, art and film. We will discuss how writers and artists have represented human interaction with the natural world – both in positive ways and resulting in conflicts between the two, e.g. issues such as the exploitation of nature, the dangers of radioactivity, pollution and degradation of the environment, climate change, but also the gifts and wisdom we receive from nature



Fall 2017

Prerequisite for all courses (except for FLG 430 and 440): FLG 202, 212, or equivalent (placement, AP Scores, etc.)

All courses except for FLG 430 are taught in German.


FLG 301 Advanced German

MWF 11:45 – 12:35, Dr. Lutz Kube, lkube@ncsu.edu

TH 11:45 – 1:00, Dr. Lynda Nyota, lknyota@ncsu.edu

This class is a continuation of FLG 202 and uses the second half of the same textbook, Anders gedacht. We focus on advanced aspects of German grammar, syntax and writing styles within the context of informative texts, art, music and film. Through authentic German language texts, modern German art (Anselm Kiefer), music (Richard Wagner), and film (Goodbye Lenin!) we shall cover topics such as Vergangenheitsbewältigung (coping with the Nazi past), life in former East Germany, and German reunification.


FLG 307 Business German

TH 3 – 4:15, Dr. Lynda Nyota, lknyota@ncsu.edu

This course will provide you with an introduction to the language used in business settings in German-speaking countries. We will cover topics such as: communication through phone, emails, letters, writing a resume and job application, preparing for a job interview, ordering products and marketing, banking, company organization forms, and doing a presentation on a product and on your company. We will also discuss current issues concerning the German and European economy.


FLG 320 Introduction to German Literature

TH 10:15 – 411:30, Dr. Ruth Gross, rvgross@ncsu.edu

You will learn to read and analyze German, Austrian, and Swiss literary texts in their cultural and historical contexts. We’ll discuss various genres (short story, novel, drama, poetry), formal aspects, literary periods, and a variety of critical approaches, using examples from the Middle Ages to the mid-twentieth century.


FLG 430 / ENG 492 / ENG 592 Screening the German Nation: Belonging and National Identity in Film and Television
MW 3:00 – 4:50
, Dr. Michelle Eley, mreley@ncsu.edu

Prerequisite: One FLG 300-level course and one from this list: FLG 315, 316, 318, 320, 323, 325, 390, or contact Dr. Eley

Explore German national identity through television and film. From early, silent horror to queer, anarchic comedy, we will look at film and TV portrayals of racial, ethnic, gender, and religious identity, and sexual orientation, and how they inform a 20th and 21st century German identity in transition.


FLG 440 Green Germany

TH 1:30 – 2:45, Dr. Helga G. Braunbeck, helga_braunbeck@ncsu.edu

Prerequisite: One FLG 300-level course.

The German-speaking culture has a long "green" tradition reflected in the arts, in literature, and in scientific discoveries. We will discuss everything from nature poetry and landscape painting to the Germans' strong environmental consciousness, the Green Party, sustainability, green architecture, issues of climate change, and the latest environmental technologies.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Spring 2017

Prerequisite for all courses (except for FLG 492): FLG 202, 212, or equivalent (placement, AP Scores, etc.).

All courses are taught in German.

FLG 302 German Oral and Written Expression

TH 1:30 – 2:45

Dr. Helga G. Braunbeck, helga_braunbeck@ncsu.edu

Have you ever wanted to develop successful reading strategies for texts written in a foreign language? How about training your ear for understanding the main points of a German lecture and taking good notes? Or creating and delivering an effective presentation that wows your audience? And finally, learning techniques for organizing arguments, facts and examples into a well-written paper? We will work with authentic German materials to develop these skills and improve all aspects of your proficiency in the German language. Topics include language and society, wealth and poverty in Germany, how language shapes your thinking, German research in antarctica as well as issues currently being discussed in Germany, Austria and Switzerland.

FLG 302 may be taken before FLG 301 – both courses strengthen language skills at the 300 level.

FLG 325 German Lyric Poetry

TH 10:15-11:30

Dr. Ruth Gross, rvgross@ncsu.edu

In this course we will read and learn to appreciate the 18th, 19th and early 20th century German lyric poem (short, personal verse) that is so much a part of the German cultural tradition. Not only will we look at poetry as poetry, by authors like Claudius, Goethe, Schiller, Mueller, Heine, etc, but also the poetry as it is musically set in its related art form, the German Lied. This course is meant for all those students who have a “fear of poetry” as well as for those who love it.

FLG 390 German Film and the Holocaust

TH 1:30 – 2:45

Dr. Lynda Nyota, mailto:lknyota@ncsu.edu

How was film instrumental in building up the Third Reich and in alienating the European Jewry? How have filmmakers, since the end of World War II to date, grappled with the task of visually representing the atrocities of the Jewish Holocaust? In this course students will examine a variety of fictional and documentary films and discuss the various ways in which filmmakers visually represent the historic events. While most of the films we will look at are from Germany, we shall also take time to examine a number of American and European films to allow students to compare German cinematic representations with film produced in other cultural contexts. The course will equip students with the necessary skills and vocabulary to talk and write about film in German, both from a technical and historical perspective.

FLG 492 Senior Seminar: Discourse, Defiance, and Disruption in German Artistic Media

MW 4:30 – 5:45

Dr. Michelle Eley, mreley@ncsu.edu

Prerequisite: Two 300 level FLG courses on literature or culture or film, or talk to Dr. Eley

In times of celebration and of conflict, the arts often attempt to create a space for people to engage with dominant discourses and sometimes to challenge the mainstream with conflicting or marginalized narratives. Artists – poets, painters, musicians, filmmakers – may be inspired and irritated to create art with "social consciousness," art that takes on issues of social significance, such as political and civil rights, environmental concerns, colonialism, crime and justice, human rights, war, and migration. This course explores the ways that artists utilize various media – including sculpture, collage, performance and theater, music, videos, film, and poetry – to make statements about social and political issues, and to participate in collective celebration, independent defiance, and even public disruption. In our study of media productions of the 20th and 21st century, we will learn about their historical and cultural context, and analyze aspects of structure and form specific to each medium. What makes a popular production? A powerful one? An effective or engaging one? We will also consider how participants in German-speaking culture react to and engage with such artistic provocations. This course is a capstone seminar in German Studies.


Fall 2016

Prerequisite for all courses (except for FLG 420 & FLG 430): FLG 202, 212, or equivalent (placement, AP Scores, etc.).

All courses are taught in German.

FLG 301 Advanced German

MW 11:45-12:35, Dr. Lutz Kube, lkube@ncsu.edu

This class is a continuation of FLG 202 and uses the second half of the same textbook, Anders gedacht. We will do advanced grammar work and writing practice within the context of informative texts, art, music and film, focusing on the city of Berlin, modern German art (Anselm Kiefer), music (Richard Wagner), and film (Germany, Pale Mother).

FLG 315 German Civilization and Culture

MW 1:30-2:45, Dr. James Brown, jhbrown3@ncsu.edu

We will discuss major aspects of German civilization, covering about 300 years from 1700 until 2000. The concept of civilization includes history, politics, literature, art, music, and architecture. One focus of the class will be the city of Berlin as the cultural and political center of Germany and as a paradigm of German history. We will also discuss on how during that 300 years a concept of the German nation was formed and changed during the course of time.

FLG 320 Introduction to German Literature

TH 10:15-11:30, Dr. Ruth Gross, rvgross@ncsu.edu

You will learn to read and analyze German, Austrian, and Swiss literary texts in their cultural and historical contexts. We’ll discuss various genres (short story, novel, drama, poetry), formal aspects, literary periods, and a variety of critical approaches, using examples from the Middle Ages to the mid-twentieth century.

FLG 420 Current Issues in German-Language Media
TH 11:45-1:00, Dr. Lynda Nyota, lknyota@ncsu.edu

Prerequisite: Two courses at the FLG 300 level
We will explore the complexity of contemporary German culture through the media. Topics covered range from information privacy, copyright issues, and Germany in relation to the EU, to environmental, educational and economic policy. New media such as news blogs, twitter feeds and podcasts, as well as older media like newspapers, radio, and television will serve not only as a means to learn about contemporary German culture, but also as the subject of conversation themselves.

FLG 430 Cultural Artifacts: Sports

TH 1:30 – 2:45, Dr. Helga G. Braunbeck, helga_braunbeck@ncsu.edu

Prerequisite: One FLG 300-level course and one from this list: FLG 315, 318, 320, 323, 325, 390, 420, 440.
Many sports have a long tradition in the German speaking cultures, both as individual pursuits and as mass spectator phenomena. We will look at how sports culture is tightly interwoven with politics, nationalism and patriotism, the culture of local and regional clubs, leisure pursuits, the aesthetics of the body, gender, nature, competition, doping, star cult and fan communities, the Olympics and other competitions, and how it is represented in the arts, literature, film, and other media.


Spring 2016

Prerequisite for all courses (except for FLG 492): FLG 202, 212, or equivalent (placement, AP Scores, etc.).

All courses are taught in German.

FLG 302 German Oral and Written Expression

MWF 10:40-11:30

Dr. Lutz Kube, lkube@ncsu.edu

In this course we will use authentic texts and materials from contemporary Germany to develop your facility with the German language. We will use images,

texts, film, and online media to discuss a variety of topics in German culture, especially youth and youth culture. We will look both to the current situation as well as to the past to see how Germany’s young compare and contrast with that of the United States. FLG 302 may be taken before FLG 301 – both courses strengthen language skills at the 300 level.


FLG 318 New German Cinema and Beyond

TH 3:00 – 4:15

Dr. Lynda Nyota, lknyota@ncsu.edu

In this course students will explore 20th and 21st century German cinema in two parts, beginning with New German Cinema, the new wave in German film production (from the 1960s to the 1980s) that closely parallels the rise and fall of the Berlin Wall. We shall examine how a new generation of German filmmakers gained an international reputation for their artistry and critical commentary on German society. The second part of the course will introduce students to a selection of “post-wall” German films (1990 to the present) that are representative of the contemporary German film scene. Students will also be introduced to basic film terminology in German and will learn how to analyze and discuss film in German.


FLG 323 Twentieth Century German Literature - Focus on Franz Kafka 

TH 10:15-11:30

Dr. Ruth Gross, rvgross@ncsu.edu

If you think of dream of musical dogs, scholarly apes, or starving as an art, writing as torture, and waking up one morning and being turned into a giant vermin (and even if you don’t) – this class is for you. The focus of this course will be Franz Kafka, one of the major German-language writers of the 20th century.


FLG 492: Senior Seminar: Environmental Literature, Art and Film

TH 1:30 – 2:45

Dr. Helga G. Braunbeck, helga_braunbeck@ncsu.edu

Prerequisite: Two 300 level FLG courses on literature or culture or film, or talk to Dr. Braunbeck

Germany's deep involvement with nature and environmental issues is reflected in its literature, art and film. We will discuss how writers and artists have represented human interaction with the natural world – both in positive ways and resulting in conflicts between the two, e.g. issues such as the exploitation of nature, the dangers of radioactivity, pollution and degradation of the environment, climate change, but also the gifts and wisdom we receive from nature.

Fall 2015

Prerequisite for all courses (except for FLG 430 & FLG 440): FLG 202, 212, or equivalent (placement, AP Scores, etc.).

All courses except for FLG 430 are taught in German.


FLG 301 Advanced German

MW 3:00-4:15, Dr. Marc Reibold, mreibol@ncsu.edu

This class is a continuation of FLG 202 and uses the second half of the same textbook, Anders gedacht. We will do advanced grammar work and writing practice within the context of informative texts, art, music and film, focusing on the city of Berlin, modern German art (Anselm Kiefer), music (Richard Wagner), and film (Germany, Pale Mother).


FLG 307 Business German

MWF 10:15-11:05, Dr. Lynda Nyota, lknyota@ncsu.edu

In this course we will learn how to function in German in various business settings. We will cover topics such as: communication through phone, emails, letters; writing a resume and job application, preparing for a job interview; ordering and marketing; banking; company organization forms, and doing a presentation on a product and on your company. We will also talk about current issues of the German and European economy.


FLG 320 Introduction to German Literature

MWF 11:20-12:10, Dr. Lutz Kube, lkube@ncsu.edu

You will learn to read and analyze German, Austrian, and Swiss literary texts in their cultural and historical contexts. We’ll discuss various genres (short story, novel, drama, poetry), formal aspects, literary periods, and a variety of critical approaches, using examples from the Middle Ages to the mid-twentieth century.


FLG 430 / ENG 492 / ENG 592 Race and German Film

MW 3:00 – 4:50, Dr. Michelle Eley, mreley@ncsu.edu

Prerequisite for FLG 430: Two FLG courses at the 300 level on literature, culture or film, or contact Dr. Eley

This course explores constructions of gender, sexual, racial, cultural and national identity through the lens of German film and television. From early, silent horror to contemporary, transnational drama, we will learn to read and analyze film as we trace how perceptions and representations of three significant racially marginalized groups – Blacks, Jews and Turks – have influenced shifting conceptions of German identity and cultural compatibility. Taught in English with German requirements for FLG credit.


FLG 440 Green Germany

TH 1:30 – 2:45, Dr. Helga G. Braunbeck, helga_braunbeck@ncsu.edu

Prerequisite: 3 Hours of 300-Level German

The German-speaking culture has a long "green" tradition reflected in the arts, in literature and in scientific discoveries. We will discuss everything from nature poetry and landscape painting to the Germans' strong environmental consciousness, the Green Party, sustainability, green architecture, issues of climate change, and the latest environmental technologies.

Fall 2014 Upper Level Courses

Prerequisite for all courses except FLG 420: FLG 202 or equivalent.

All courses taught in German.


FLG 301 – Advanced German

TTH 11:45 - 1:00

Instructor TBA

Mastering advanced German grammar should help you communicate your ideas better and with higher accuracy. This class features grammar work and advanced writing practice within the context of informative texts, art, music and film, such as texts on the city of Berlin, modern German art (Anselm Kiefer), music (Richard Wagner), and film (Germany, Pale Mother). This class is a continuation of FLG 202 and uses the second half of the same textbook, Anders gedacht.

 

FLG 315 – German Civilization and Culture

MWF 11:20 - 12:10

Dr. Lutz Kube, lkube@ncsu.edu

In this class, we will discuss major aspects of German civilization, covering about 300 years from 1700 until 2000. The concept of civilization includes history, politics, literature, art, music, and architecture. One focus of the class will be the city of Berlin as the cultural and political center of Germany and as a paradigm of German history. We will also discuss on how during that 300 years a concept of the German nation was formed and changed during the course of time.

 

FLG 320 – Introduction to German Literature

TTH 10:15 - 11:30

Dr. Ruth Gross, rvgross@ncsu.edu

You will learn to read and analyze German, Austrian, and Swiss literary texts in their cultural and historical contexts. We’ll discuss various genres (short story, novel, drama, poetry), formal aspects, literary periods, and a variety of critical approaches, using examples from the Middle Ages to the mid-twentieth century.

 

FLG 420 – Current Issues in German-Language Media

TTH 3:00 - 4:15

Instructor TBA

Prerequisite: Two courses at the FLG 300 level

In this course, we will explore the complexity of contemporary German culture through the media. We will cover topics ranging from immigration, EU expansion, and reunification, to economic, educational and environmental issues. New media such as podcasts and wikis, as well as older media like newspapers, radio, and television will serve not only as a means to learn about contemporary German culture, but also as the subject of conversation themselves.


GERM 373: Von “Bau auf” bis “Der blaue Planet”: A History of the GDR in Songs

MW 1:45-3:00

Dr. Regine Criser (UNC Asheville) rcriser@unca.edu - via live

videoconferencing with NC State. Register through UNC Online at:

http://online.northcarolina.edu/unconline/exdetails.php?exid=1

Next to the heading "German Course Exchange" click on the tab "Courses". Then click on GERM 373. Then click on "add to basket" or "register now" and follow instructions to register using your NC State campus credentials. The course will appear as FL 300 in your NC State degree audit and will count for both the German Studies Major and the German Minor.

 This class will approach the GDR through a musical perspective. We will analyze a variety of popular and less popular songs as significant cultural productions that allow a unique insight into the society and culture of the GDR.

These songs further provide ample opportunities to highlight crucial historical developments in the GDR’s 40-year-long existence as well as the country’s position within the international network of the music industry.

This course will count as FL 300, a 300-level German course. For more details on this course, talk to your instructor or the German section coordinator and local liaison for this course: Dr. Helga Braunbeck (hgb@ncsu.edu)

Spring 2014 Upper Level Courses

Prerequisite for all courses except FLG 492: FLG 202 or equivalent.

FLG 302 German Oral and Written Expression

MWF 3:00-3:50

Dr. Marc Reibold, mreibol@ncsu.edu

In this course we will use authentic texts and materials from contemporary Germany to develop your facility with the German language. We will use images, texts, film, and online media to discuss a variety of topics in German culture, especially youth and youth culture.


FLG 311 Introduction to German Translation

TuTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM

Dr. Michelle Eley, mreley@ncsu.edu & Dr. Jonathan Wipplinger, jowippli@ncsu.edu

This course provides a practical and theoretical introduction to translation from and into German. What is the role of the translator? By what criteria can a translator make his or her decisions? Translation practices will be discussed not only from a linguistic, but also from a cultural and historical perspective.


FLG 318 New German Cinema

MWF 11:20-12:10

Dr. Lutz Kube, lkube@ncsu.edu

New German Cinema stands for a period in German film (from the 1960s to the 1980s) when a new generation of German filmmakers gained an international reputation for their artistry and critical social commentary on German society. In this class, we will view a number of their films and discuss their significance for German culture.


FLG 323 Twentieth Century Literature – Focus on Franz Kafka

TuTh 10:15-11:30

Dr. Ruth Gross, rvgross@ncsu.edu       

If you think of dream of musical dogs, scholarly apes, or starving as an art, writing as torture, and waking up one morning and being turned into a giant vermin (and even if you don’t) – this class is for you. The focus of this course will be Franz Kafka, one of the major German-language writers of the 20th century.


FLG 492 Senior Seminar: Germany’s Roaring Twenties
TuTh 11:45-1:00

Dr. Jonathan Wipplinger, jowippli@ncsu.edu

The 1920s is one of the most exciting and turbulent periods of German history. Against a backdrop of economic and social upheaval German culture produced some of the most important and innovative artworks of the 20th century. Preq: Two 300 level FLG courses on literature or culture or film, or talk to Dr. Wipplinger


GERM 4700 The Contemporary German-Speaking World: Metropolis Berlin (Distance Course offered via the UNC Foreign Language Assembly)

MW 1:30-2:45 (live videoconferencing)

Dr. Susanne Lenné Jones, ECU, jonessu@ecu.edu

Metropolis Berlin, one of the most exciting European cities today, lures with a rich culture, unique history and vibrant diversity. In this course, we will focus on Berlin as a microcosm of German society, exploring the historical, political, literary, architectural and cinematic aspects of this vibrant city.

To learn more about this course, speak with a German Studies advisor, or visit:http://online.northcarolina.edu/unconline/exdetails.php?exid=1&tab=home

Fall 2013 Upper Level Courses

Prerequisite for all courses except FLG 430: FLG 202 or equivalent.


FLG 301 – Advanced German

MWF 11:20 - 12:10

Dr. Lutz Kube, lkube@ncsu.edu

Mastering advanced German grammar should help you communicate your ideas better and with higher accuracy. This class features grammar work and advanced writing practice within the context of informative texts, art, music and film, such as texts on the city of Berlin, modern German art (Anselm Kiefer), music (Richard Wagner), and film (Germany, Pale Mother). This class is a continuation of FLG 202 and uses the second half of the same textbook, Anders gedacht.


FLG 307 – Business German

MW 1:30 - 2:45

Dr. Jonathan Wipplinger, jowippli@ncsu.edu

In this course we will learn how to function in German in various business settings. We will cover topics such as: communication through phone, emails, letters; writing a resume and job application, preparing for a job interview; ordering and marketing; banking; company organization forms, and doing a presentation on a product and on your company. We will also talk about current issues of the German and European economy.


FLG 320 – Introduction to German Literature

TTH 10:15 - 11:30

Dr. Ruth Gross, rvgross@ncsu.edu

You will learn to read and analyze German, Austrian, and Swiss literary texts in their cultural and historical contexts. We’ll discuss various genres (short story, novel, drama, poetry), formal aspects, literary periods, and a variety of critical approaches, using examples from the eighteenth to the mid-twentieth century.


FLG 430 / ENG 492 – Race in German Film

TTH 3:00 - 4:50
Dr. Michelle Eley, mreley@ncsu.edu

Prerequisite: Two courses at the FLG 300 level

This course explores constructions of gender, sexual, racial, cultural and national identity through the lens of German film and television. From early, silent horror to contemporary, transnational drama, we will learn to read, analyze and appreciate film as we trace how perceptions and representations of three significant racially marginalized groups -- Blacks, Jews and Turks -- have influenced shifting conceptions of German identity and cultural compatibility. In English, w/German requirements for FLG students, and German discussion opportunities for all interested.


This semester we are also offering two courses via the reorganized German Studies Consortium, now offered through the UNC Foreign Language Assembly:


GER 302: Study in Germany

Times: MW 3:30-4:45 PM

Taught via Blackboard Collaborate

Dr. Brooke Kreitinger, UNC-Greensboro 

This course is designed for students who have completed introductory and intermediate German courses and who are preparing for study abroad in Germany. It is also well suited for students who are looking to advance their German from the intermediate to the advanced level in all four skills, reading, listening, speaking, and writing.

Course Goals: 1) To familiarize students with Baden-Württemberg and its historical, political, and cultural context within Germany and Europe. 2) To introduce and practice academic literacy conventions specific to the German university system with a particular focus on writing and speaking. Taught in German


GER 406-01: Expressionism

Times: TBA with individual students.

Taught online via Blackboard

Professor Andreas Lixl, UNC-Greensboro

This fully-online literature and culture course focuses on German Expressionism based on intermediate to advanced level readings and discussions. Course exhibits and digital excursions are available in both German and English. All studies materials are available on UNCG’s Blackboard, free of charge, and are examined and discussed in the context of socio-historical, literary, and artistic movements. Given the broad canopy of this course, each unit presents a cross-cultural panorama of literary masterworks, dramas, poems, novels, memoirs, and digital media exhibits. The interdisciplinary inquiries of avant-garde writers, painters, musicians, and film makers advance both linguistic and literary proficiencies. After completing this web-based course, students will be able to describe and discuss the impacts of "German Expressionism," “Dadaism,” “Weimar Culture, “Post-Modernism” and “Pop-Culture” on 20th-century German literature and art in both German and English.

You can sign up for GER 302 and GER 406 through the new UNC portal for the Language Exchange:  

http://online.northcarolina.edu/unconline/exchange.php

The right side of the screen lists the current Exchanges.  If you are looking for a German, Russian or Portuguese course click on the appropriate button.  If you are looking for another language, click the World Language button.

You can also search for courses by clicking on the Course tab at the top of the page or the “Search and compare courses" link on the lower left.  Then, search for the language you need.

Click on the courses for which you would like to register. When you click on the link to add a course to your basket, you will be asked to login through your campus. You must be logged in to continue with the registration process. 

After you have logged in, you will see the course listed in your basket.  Click on the link to register for the course.

The registration process is largely manual at this time.  As we move forward, it will be automated.  Once you complete registering for the courses you need, you will need to print out the resulting form and take it to your advisor, the department chair,  and the registrar for signatures (Dr. Braunbeck, Dr. Eley, Dr. Wipplinger, and Dr. Gross).

This online portal registration is a new system for all of us, but it is not new to the registrars and deans, as they have been following this procedure for several years.  If you have questions about the process, please contact the registrar at your home institution. Please forward this information to all students interested in registering for courses in the Exchange.

Spring 2013 Upper Level Courses

Prerequisite for all courses (except for FLG 430 & FLG 492): FLG 202 or equivalent.

All courses are taught in German.


FLG 302 German Oral and Written Expression

MWF 10:15-11:05

Dr. Marc Reibold, mreibol@ncsu.edu

In this course we will use authentic texts and materials from contemporary Germany to develop your facility with the German language. We will use images, texts, film, and online media to discuss a variety of topics in German culture, especially youth and youth culture. We will look both to the current situation as well as to the past to see how Germany’s young compare and contrast with that of the United States.


FLG 315 German Civilization and Culture

MWF 11:20-12:10

Dr. Lutz Kube, lkube@ncsu.edu

In this class, we will discuss major aspects of German civilization, covering about 300 years from 1700 until 2000. The concept of civilization includes history, politics, literature, art, music, and architecture. One focus of the class will be the city of Berlin as the cultural and political center of Germany and as a paradigm of German history. We will also discuss on how during that 300 years a concept of the German nation was formed and changed during the course of time.


FLG 325 German Lyric Poetry

TH 10:15-11:30

Dr. Ruth Gross, rvgross@ncsu.edu

In this course we will read and learn to appreciate the 18th, 19th and early 20th century German lyric poem (short, personal verse) that is so much a part of the German cultural tradition. Not only will we look at poetry as poetry, by authors like Claudius, Goethe, Schiller, Mueller, Heine, etc, but also the poetry as it is musically set in its related art form, the German Lied. This course is meant for all those students who have a “fear of poetry” as well as for those who love it.


FLG 430 Germany and the European Union

MW 3:00-4:30

Oliver Ham, obham@ncsu.edu

We will sketch the history of the European Union from its beginning in 1951 to the Fall of the Wall. The course will focus on the impact that the Cold War had on the EU and West Germany. We will work with a variety of media, such as film, music and primary documents (ranging from newspaper articles to official government documents). Prerequisite: Two FLG 300-level FLG courses, or talk to Mr. Ham.


FLG 492 Senior Seminar: Art, Activism and Revolution

MW 1:30-2:45

Dr. Michelle Eley, mreley@ncsu.edu

Born in response to the horrors of WWI and to bourgeois nationalism, the Zurich Dada art movement quickly expanded through Europe and North America. With an anti-war philosophy and innovative "anti-art" artworks, Dadaists aimed to completely reshape society. Beginning with this exciting movement, we will explore art as a form of political resistance throughout the 20th century and consider its potential to provoke revolutionary change. Objects of study will include visual and performance arts, literature, film and music, as well as theoretical and critical texts.

Prerequisite: Two 300 level FLG courses on literature or culture or film, or talk to Dr. Eley.

Fall 2012 Upper Level Courses

Prerequisite for all courses except FLG 420, 430: FLG 202 or equivalent.

All courses taught in German.


FLG 301 – Advanced German

MWF 11:20 - 12:10

Dr. Lutz Kube, lkube@ncsu.edu

Mastering advanced German grammar should help you communicate your ideas better and with higher accuracy. This class features grammar work and advanced writing practice within the context of informative texts, art, music and film, such as texts on the city of Berlin, modern German art (Anselm Kiefer), music (Richard Wagner), and film (Germany, Pale Mother). This class is a continuation of FLG 202 and uses the second half of the same textbook, Anders gedacht.


FLG 320 – Introduction to German Literature

TTH10:15AM - 11:30AM

Dr. Ruth Gross, rvgross@ncsu.edu

You will learn to read and analyze German, Austrian, and Swiss literary texts in their cultural and historical contexts. We’ll discuss various genres (short story, novel, drama, poetry), formal aspects, literary periods, and a variety of critical approaches, using examples from the Middle Ages to the mid-twentieth century.


FLG 390 – Topics in German Studies: Heimat, Fatherland, Europe

MWF 3:00-3:50

Dr. Derrick Miller (UNCW) - via live videoconferencing with NC State. Local liaison for this course: Dr. Helga G. Braunbeck, helga_braunbeck@ncsu.edu

This course explores ideas of homeland, patriotism, the nation, and German history over the course of the twentieth century. The first half is structured Edgar Reitz’s landmark film Heimat: Eine deutsche Chronik (1984) which explores three German families in a small town from 1918 to 1982. And the second half of the course is structured around Wladimir Kaminer’s best-selling serial novel, Russendisko (2002) which examines multicultural post-unification Germany.


FLG 420 – Current Issues in German-Language Media

MW 1:30 - 2:45

Dr. Jonathan Wipplinger, jowippli@ncsu.edu

Prerequisite: Two courses at the FLG 300 level

In this course, we will explore the complexity of contemporary German culture through the media. We will cover topics ranging from immigration, EU expansion, and reunification, to economic, educational and environmental issues. New media such as podcasts and wikis, as well as older media like newspapers, radio, and television will serve not only as a means to learn about contemporary German culture, but also as a subject of conversation themselves.


FLG 430 – Cultural Artifacts in the German-Speaking Countries: The Other Germany

MWF 10:15 - 11:05 p.m.

Dr. Lutz Kube, lkube@ncsu.edu

Prerequisite: Two courses at the FLG 300 level

In this class, we will explore aspects of the ideological, political and economic system of the German Democratic Republic (East Germany), and how it affected the everyday experiences of East Germans. We will also examine the experience of East Germans after unification in 1990. Resources for our studies will be scholarly studies on the GDR, literary and non-literary texts on life in East Germany, as well as examples of East German music, film, and the visual arts.